Author Topic: Niobium (Nb) and other minerals  (Read 820 times)

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mauricio

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Niobium (Nb) and other minerals
« on: October 03, 2016, 05:50:20 PM »
My question is on the niobium (Nb) and other minerals, and how they can be better ultilizados the Magisterial Mission, I have to min it may be possible to work with 3 pillars: efficiency, Altruism and responsibility when it comes to improvement for all human beings, Brazil in recent research possess 98% of niobium, please I will not be an arrogant nationalist here in the forum to say that Brazil is the richest piece of land on the planet, I'm interested in how man can improve his behavior to be responsible in using minerals for magisterial mission?

Ron Besser

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Re: Niobium (Nb) and other minerals
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2016, 09:41:44 PM »
Mauricio, you know as much as we do: How will the Magisterial Mission used rare minerals from the great storage area of Brazil?  We will have to wait to see what their policy is regarding the natural wealth of Urantia including that which appears so abundantly in Brazil.  Ron
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mauricio

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Re: Niobium (Nb) and other minerals
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2016, 10:32:38 PM »
I had not stopped to think so Ron, Thanks for the reply :)

Ron Besser

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Re: Niobium (Nb) and other minerals
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2016, 12:41:01 AM »
General information: I had no idea of what this metal was for I never heard of it until Mauricio proudly suggested that Brazil is the main exporter of this find.  It is used for an alloy in iron and steel and makes them much stronger pipes especially for gas lines and other transport pipes in the world.  The United States is one of the largest importers of this from Brazil I am sure.


Here is the Wikipedia blurb on this metal ( a grey soft metal that looks like a once melted lead pool)
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niobium  and has a picture of it as an ore)


Niobium has physical and chemical properties similar to those of the element tantalum, and the two are difficult to distinguish. The English chemist Charles Hatchett reported a new element similar to tantalum in 1801 and named it columbium. In 1809, the English chemist William Hyde Wollaston wrongly concluded that tantalum and columbium were identical. The German chemist Heinrich Rose determined in 1846 that tantalum ores contain a second element, which he named niobium. In 1864 and 1865, a series of scientific findings clarified that niobium and columbium were the same element (as distinguished from tantalum), and for a century both names were used interchangeably. Niobium was officially adopted as the name of the element in 1949, but the name columbium remains in current use in metallurgy in the United States.


It was not until the early 20th century that niobium was first used commercially. Brazil is the leading producer of niobium and ferroniobium, an alloy of niobium and iron which has a niobium content of 60-70%. Niobium is used mostly in alloys, the largest part in special steel such as that used in gas pipelines. Although these alloys contain a maximum of 0.1%, the small percentage of niobium enhances the strength of the steel. The temperature stability of niobium-containing superalloys is important for its use in jet and rocket engines.


Niobium is used in various superconducting materials. These superconducting alloys, also containing titanium and tin, are widely used in the superconducting magnets of MRI scanners. Other applications of niobium include welding, nuclear industries, electronics, optics, numismatics, and jewelry. In the last two applications, the low toxicity and iridescence produced by anodization are highly desired properties.
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